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RFID Reader Antenna Basics - Gain and EIRP

January 24, 2020 8:04:16 AM EST

For New Wave product information, or to order New Wave RFID antennas, visit https://www.arcantenna.com/antenna-manufacturers/newave-sensor-solution

 

RFID ANTENNA BASICS – GAIN AND EIRP

Author: RJ Burkholder, Research Professor of Electromagnetics and RF at The Ohio State University

 

In the last blog, I maintained that the antenna is the most important part of a UHF RFID system (see figure below). This is because the computer software, reader, and RFID tag are quite optimized now, and often outside the control of the system designer/integrator. Performance improvements must come from the antenna and its deployment.

 

image1-300x188.jpg

 

A typical UHF RFID inventory system

 

Before getting into the fine art of antenna deployment, it is first necessary to understand the basic principles of how antennas work and how the electromagnetic field radiated by an antenna fills and penetrates a given space. The main issues are polarization, fading, attenuation, gain, maximum EIRP (effective isotropic radiated power) and diversity. A good understanding of these issues will aid the designer in selecting the type and number of antennas, and where to put them for optimum performance.

 

The most basic characteristic of an antenna is its gain. This number is defined as the amplification of the antenna compared with an antenna that radiates equally in all directions. Hence, the units of gain are often dBi, which means “decibels relative to isotropic”. By definition, an antenna that has greater than 0 dBi gain does not radiate isotopically (the same in all directions) but has a gain pattern, sometimes referred to as its antenna pattern, or directivity pattern, as illustrated below.

 

image2-300x139.png

 

Gain patterns of a broad beam antenna and a narrow beam antenna.

 

The narrow beam antenna has a higher gain than the broad beam antenna, but a much smaller angular coverage. This is because both antennas radiate the same total power, and the gain pattern determines how this power is distributed. (Note that I am assuming here for simplicity that the antennas are 100% efficient. In other words, all of the power input to the antenna is radiated.) Our first principle is this:

 

  1. For the same amount of radiated power, increasing the gain of an antenna decreases the angular coverage.

 

A typical patch-type RFID antenna has a gain of about 6 dBi and looks like the broad beam pattern above. The designer might like to improve the read range by using an antenna with a higher gain, like the narrow beam antenna above, if angular coverage is not important. Unfortunately, it’s not that simple, but not because of the antenna.

 

This brings us to a very important concept in UHF RFID, namely, Effective Isotropic Radiated Power (EIRP). EIRP is defined as the amount of power that a theoretical isotropic antenna would emit to produce the peak power density observed in the direction of maximum antenna gain. For example, a typical RFID reader generates 30 dBm (decibels relative to a milliwatt) of RF power. Connecting a patch antenna with 6 dBi gain results in an EIRP of 36 dBm (30+6).

 

It so happens that 36 dBm is the maximum EIRP allowed by the FCC for electronic devices in the UHF RFID band. Now suppose I want to use the narrow beam antenna shown above, which has a gain of 12 dBi for example. Then the EIRP becomes 42 dBm which is over the FCC limit. I will have to reduce the reader's power to compensate. Our second principle is this:

 

  1. Increasing the gain of an antenna also increases the EIRP, which is limited by the FCC.

 

Therefore, for maximum read range, it doesn’t necessarily help to use a high gain antenna because you will have to reduce the RF power. The only advantage of a high gain antenna in RFID is to get a good read range with minimal power or to focus a beam in a limited coverage area.

 

For New Wave product information, or to order New Wave RFID antennas, visit https://www.arcantenna.com/antenna-manufacturers/newave-sensor-solution

Comments | Posted in News By Web Content1

For New Wave product information, or to order New Wave RFID antennas, visit https://www.arcantenna.com/antenna-manufacturers/newave-sensor-solution

 

RFID READER ANTENNA BASICS – OVERCOMING FADING WITH ANTENNA DIVERSITY

 

Author: RJ Burkholder, Research Professor of Electromagnetics and RF at The Ohio State University

 

In the last several blogs I maintained that the antenna is the most important part of a UHF RFID system (see figure below). This is because the computer software, reader, and RFID tag are fairly optimized now, and often outside the control of the system designer anyway. Performance improvements must come from the proper selection of the antenna and its deployment.

 

image1

 

A typical UHF RFID inventory system

 

Before getting into the fine art of antenna deployment, it was first necessary to understand the basic principles of how antennas work and how the electromagnetic field radiated by an antenna fills and penetrates a given space. The main issues are polarization, fading, gain, EIRP (effective isotropic radiated power) and diversity. A good understanding of these issues will aid the designer in selecting the type and number of antennas, and where to put them for optimum performance.

 

To review, we first explored the most basic characteristic of an antenna, namely, its gain. This number is defined as the directional amplification of the antenna compared with an antenna that radiates equally in all directions (isotropic). Gain is closely related to Effective Isotropic Radiated Power (EIRP). EIRP is defined as the amount of power that a theoretical isotropic antenna would emit to produce the peak power density observed in the direction of maximum antenna gain. EIRP is limited by the FCC to 36 dBm (decibels relative to a milliwatt) of RF power. As we saw, because of this limit, it does not always help to use a high-gain antenna because the EIRP will likely be exceeded unless the RFID reader power is reduced accordingly.

 

In the last blog we learned about the important characteristic of antenna polarization. Polarization defines the predominant direction of the electric field radiated or received by an antenna. It was illustrated that using a single patch-type reader antenna in a static scenario is likely to miss a significant percentage of tags simply because the polarization is misaligned. Even a circularly polarized antenna, which can detect a tag in any orientation transverse to the radiation direction, will miss tags that are oriented along the radiation direction as shown below.

 

new-project1

 

Two antennas provide polarization diversity for reading an RFID tag that a single antenna is not able to read due to the tag orientation.

 

This introduced the concept of antenna diversity, which means using more than one antenna to cover a given region in order to overcome the limitations of a single antenna. This brings us to the present topic of mitigating fading with antenna diversity. A polarization mismatch is not the only limitation of using a single reader antenna. Any single antenna has nulls where the radiated field is very low. Typically, an antenna is designed so that the nulls are towards the back and sides, and the main beam is free from nulls when the antenna radiates in empty space. However, in a realistic RFID environment, there is always multipath, as illustrated in the figure below.

 

image

 

Overcoming fading in a static environment with antenna diversity. Multiple RFID antennas provide spatial diversity for reading a tag that a single antenna is not able to read due to fading caused by multipath interference.

 

When multipath is present, due to reflections from the floor, ceiling, walls, and large objects, the electric field associated with each path can form an interference pattern. At points where the fields add in phase, constructive interference occurs and the pattern has a strong peak. Conversely, where the fields are out of phase, destructive interference occurs and the pattern has a null. If you've ever been at a stoplight and notice the radio reception has gone out, you are probably in a null. The reception comes back when your car moves out of the null sometimes just by moving a few feet. Wireless communications systems always have to deal with this issue. One solution is to use a different frequency because the interference pattern is highly frequency dependent. Changing the frequency moves the nulls. This is one reason why UHF RFID in North America covers a relatively large 26 MHz frequency band from 902 to 928 MHz. Readers can frequency-hop within this band to avoid interfering with other nearby readers, but also to help mitigate the effects of fading and improve the read rate.

 

Another example you have probably seen is a wireless router. They usually have at least two antennas. Some of the higher capacity routers have three or four antennas. The primary purpose of these antennas is to provide diversity in polarization and space. The interference pattern and nulls of an antenna are very sensitive to its placement and orientation. Another antenna placed just a few inches away will have a completely different pattern. This allows two or more antennas to have far better coverage of a multipath rich environment than a single antenna.

 

The same principles of antenna diversity apply to RFID readers. That's why most UHF readers have more than one antenna port. A general misunderstanding in RFID is that more antennas let you cover more area. That is true to a certain extent, but if you only have one antenna covering a given area, the read rate will suffer. For the best coverage, at least two antennas should cover any given point in the region of interest. This is illustrated below.

 

image1

 

Diversity-rich RFID coverage zone using for patch antennas on opposite sides. Overlapping beams from different directions provide spatial diversity as well as polarization diversity.

 

The example above shows an effective way to cover a fairly large area using four patch antennas (up to 20 feet). The antennas can be connected to the same 4-port RFID reader. This arrangement provides polarization diversity as well by tilting the beams. 4-port readers can be easily extended to 16 antennas using a multiplexing switch. There are many possibilities for antenna placement, but this basic concept of exploiting diversity will greatly improve tag reading performance.

 

In this blog, we have extended the concept of antenna diversity to include spatial diversity. The next blog will show how the Wave® antenna is ideally suited for zone coverage with a minimum number of antennas. Each antenna uniquely provides multiple overlapping beams in the zone surrounding the antenna.

 

For New Wave product information, or to order New Wave RFID antennas, visit https://www.arcantenna.com/antenna-manufacturers/newave-sensor-solution

Comments | Posted in News By Web Content1

For New Wave product information, or to order New Wave RFID antennas, visit https://www.arcantenna.com/antenna-manufacturers/newave-sensor-solution

.

RFID READER ANTENNA BASICS – THE WAVE® ANTENNA SOLUTION

Author: RJ Burkholder, Research Professor of Electromagnetics and RF at The Ohio State University

 

In the last several blogs I explained why the antenna is the most important part of designing a UHF RFID system (see figure below). This is because the computer software, reader, and RFID tag are fairly optimized now, and often outside the control of the system designer anyway. Performance improvements must come from the proper selection of the antenna and its deployment.

 

image1

 

Before getting to antenna deployment in RFID system design, it was first necessary to understand the basic principles of how antennas work and how the electromagnetic field radiated by an antenna fills and penetrates a given space. The main issues are polarization, fading, gain, EIRP (effective isotropic radiated power) and diversity. A good understanding of these issues will aid the designer in selecting the type and number of antennas, and where to put them for optimum performance.

 

To review, we first explored the most basic characteristic of an antenna, namely, its gain. This number is defined as the directional amplification of the antenna compared with an antenna that radiates equally in all directions (isotropic). Gain is closely related to Effective Isotropic Radiated Power (EIRP). EIRP is defined as the amount of power that a theoretical isotropic antenna would emit to produce the peak power density observed in the direction of maximum antenna gain. EIRP is limited by the FCC to 36 dBm (decibels relative to a milliwatt) of RF power.

 

As we saw, because of this limit, it does not always help to use a high-gain antenna because the EIRP will likely be exceeded unless the RFID reader power is reduced accordingly. Next, we learned about the important characteristic of antenna polarization. Polarization defines the predominant direction of the electric field radiated or received by an antenna. It was illustrated that using a single patch-type reader antenna in a static scenario is likely to miss a significant percentage of tags simply because the polarization is misaligned. Even a circularly polarized antenna, which can detect a tag in any orientation transverse to the radiation direction, will miss tags that are oriented along the radiation direction.

 

new-project1

 

Two antennas provide polarization diversity for reading an RFID tag that a single antenna is not able to read due to the tag orientation.

 

This introduced the most important concept of antenna diversity, which means using more than one antenna to cover a given region in order to overcome the limitations of a single antenna. Polarization misalignment is not the only limitation of using a single reader antenna. Any single antenna has nulls where the radiated field is very low. Typically, an antenna is designed so that the nulls are towards the back and sides, and the main beam is free from nulls when the antenna radiates in empty space. However, in a realistic RFID environment, there is always multipath due to reflections from the floor, ceiling, walls, and large objects that give rise to interference between direct and reflected fields. Fading occurs in regions where this interference is destructive, i.e., the fields are out of phase and tend to cancel.

 

Fading is overcome the same way as polarization misalignment, by using more than one antenna. The interference pattern and nulls of an antenna are very sensitive to its placement and orientation. A second antenna placed just a short distance away from the first will have a completely different pattern. This allows two or more antennas to have far better coverage of a multipath rich environment than a single antenna.

 

Antenna diversity is why most UHF readers have more than one antenna port. A general misunderstanding in RFID is that more antennas let you cover more area. That is true to a certain extent, but if you only have one antenna covering a given area, the read rate will suffer. For the best coverage, at least two antennas should cover any given point in the region of interest. This is illustrated below.

 

image1

 

Diversity-rich RFID coverage zone using four patch antennas on opposite sides. Overlapping beams from different directions provide spatial diversity as well as polarization diversity.

 

The example above shows an effective way to cover a fairly large area using four patch antennas (up to 20 feet). The antennas can be connected to the same 4-port RFID reader. This arrangement provides polarization diversity as well by tilting the beams. However, notice that the patch antennas are not ideal for covering a specified area due to their single-beam illumination. That is why it requires at least 4 antennas.

 

Is it possible to design an antenna that is optimized for the type of zone coverage shown above? The answer is the Wave® antennaThe Wave® antenna is ideally suited for zone coverage with a minimum number of antennas. It makes use of distributed radiation rather than beam radiation, as shown below.

 

screenshot_2019-03-11-rjb_blog6_3-5-19-pdf

 

The Wave® antenna has distributed radiation from multiple points along its length. The gain pattern shows multiple beams from one antenna.

 

The antenna has multiple radiating elements along its length that generate multiple overlapping beams in the volume surrounding the antenna. (In fact, 5 beams have been measured from the 7-foot version of the Wave®.) Compared to the patch antenna, which is like a spotlight, the Wave® antenna is like a fluorescent light bulb. It doesn’t have the long-range and directionality of a patch antenna but provides much more uniform coverage of the area around the antenna. Furthermore, the overlapping beams of the Wave® provide all 3 polarizations, whereas a patch antenna can only provide 2 at most. This makes the Wave® ideal for item-level zone coverage of densely populated regions of RFID tagged products in warehouses, retail stores, and portals.

A single Wave® antenna could cover an entire zone, but this antenna obeys the same physical laws as any other antenna and will have nulls and polarization misalignment at certain points within its range. Therefore, a second Wave® antenna is always used in tandem with the first antenna to provide the required diversity protection, as shown below.

 

screenshot_2019-03-11-rjb_blog6_3-5-19-pdf1

 

Wave® antennas cover the zone using only two antennas, providing natural polarization and spatial diversity.

 

As the figure shows, only two antennas are used to cover the entire zone, whereas at least five conventional patch antennas would be required to provide the same number of overlapping beams. It is noted that the two Wave® antennas do not need to be deployed on opposite sides of the coverage area, but can also be placed side-by-side with a small vertical offset. (Notice that the two antennas above are slightly offset in the vertical direction.)

 

In this and previous blogs, we have learned how to properly deploy antennas for diverse coverage of an RFID reading zone using the minimum amount of resources. Future blogs will focus on how these principles are extended to practical applications of item-level RFID in the logistics chain.

 

For New Wave product information, or to order New Wave RFID antennas, visit https://www.arcantenna.com/antenna-manufacturers/newave-sensor-solution

Comments | Posted in News By Web Content1

For New Wave product information, or to order New Wave RFID antennas, visit https://www.arcantenna.com/antenna-manufacturers/newave-sensor-solution

 

RFID READER ANTENNA BASICS – OPTIMIZING TAG SELECTION & DEPLOYMENT

Author: RJ Burkholder, Research Professor of Electromagnetics and RF at The Ohio State University

 

In the last several blogs I explained why the antenna is the most important part of designing a UHF RFID system (see figure below). This is because the computer software, reader, and RFID tag are fairly optimized now, and often outside the control of the system designer anyway. But let’s assume we have some say in the deployment of the RFID tags in the scenario of interest. For example, the reader antenna configuration may be more constrained due to space limitations, so proper tag deployment becomes more critical.

 

rjb blog 1.png

 

To review, we explored the basic characteristics of an antenna: gain, Effective Isotropic Radiated Power (EIRP) and polarization. Assuming the reader antennas are deployed for good illumination of the volume containing the tags, polarization is the most important consideration in the deployment of a tag. As we learned previously, polarization defines the predominant direction of the electric field radiated or received by an antenna. For a conventional antenna like the patch antenna, the polarization is always transverse to the direction of radiation outside the near-field region of the antenna. Therefore, the polarization of the receiving antenna(RFID tag) needs to be at least partially aligned with the polarization of the transmitting antenna, as illustrated below.

rjb blog 2.png

 

Alignment of the receiving antennas (RFID tags) relative to the polarization of the reader antenna (red arrow) and radiation direction (blue arrow).

 

In this example, the patch antenna is linearly polarized in the vertical direction (red arrow). The RFID tags are dipole antennas which are also linearly polarized. From left to right, the first two tags will have a good received signal, but the last tag on the right will probably not be excited. Similarly, if the antenna is horizontally polarized none of these tags would be excited – because the first two are oriented vertically and the third one is aligned in the radial direction. Circular polarization(CP) is a combination of vertical and horizontal polarizations with a 90° phase difference between the two. CP antennas can read tags that are at least partially oriented in any plane transverse to the direction of radiation (blue arrow). For this reason, CP patch antennas are the most common in UHF RFID applications. There is a cost, however, because CP antennas have a 3 dB reduction in gain for reading linearly polarized tags.

 

Similarly, CP tag antennas may be used with linearly polarized reader antennas. Ironically, CP tag antennas may not be the best choice for CP reader antennas because CP always has a left- or right-handed definition. If the CP tag is not correctly matched or oriented with respect to the CP reader antenna, it may not be detected. Often the only way to check this is by trial and error.

 

The radial direction away from the antenna is the worst possible orientation of a tag because it is orthogonal to both transverse directions. RFID tags should be mounted transverse to the radial direction from the reader antenna as much as possible, and never along the radial direction.

 

Using more than one antenna certainly helps the situation as shown below. As discussed in previous blogs, this introduces antenna diversity and polarization diversityRFID readers typically have more than one antenna port for this reason. They cycle through the antennas to maximize the total number of reads in a given coverage area. If one antenna polarization is not aligned with all of the tags, it is likely that one of the other antennas is aligned.

 

rjb blog 3.png

 

Two antennas provide polarization diversity for reading an RFID tag that a single antenna is not able to read due to the tag orientation.

 

Many of the above issues associated with conventional patch antennas are overcome by the specially designed Wave® antenna as described previously and shown below. The multiple overlapping beams of the Wave® antenna naturally provide spatial and polarization diversity. For this reason, it is the obvious choice for item-level RFID systems. The Wave® antenna virtually eliminates read errors caused by misaligned tags.

 

rjb blog 4.png

 

The Wave® antenna has distributed radiation from multiple points along its length. Tags in virtually any orientation are readable.

 

Besides the deployment of tags relative to the reader antennas, it is equally important to choose the proper tag for the application and mount it on the item in a way that facilities reading. For example, standard printed RFID tags should never be put directly on metal surfaces or in liquids. A tag on a metal surface will be shorted out, and a tag in a liquid will probably not be detected due to the attenuation of the RF signal. There are specially designed tags that can be placed on metal or other highly conducting surfaces. They always employ some sort of spacer between the antenna and the metal as shown below. The tag then operates similar to a microstrip patch antenna or folded dipole.

 

rjb blog 5.png

 

RFID tags that are designed for metal surfaces always have a spacer between the antenna and metal. The tag on the right is a standard printed tag on a foam spacer, rather than a custom-designed tag.

 

In fact, a standard printed tag can be used effectively on a metal surface simply by placing a foam spacer between the tag and metal as shown on the right in the above figure. The spacer should be at least 1/8” thick. This type of tag can also be used on plastic bottles containing liquids.

 

Standard RFID tags work well when attached to paper, cardboard, fabric, thin plastic or glass, assuming there is no metal in close proximity to the tag. They can also be detected through these materials, making it possible to completely hide the tag. Common approaches are to put the tag inside cardboard packaging or sandwiched inside a label. They can also be easily RFID Expert’s Corner embedded inside a thin plastic card such as a credit card or ID badge. Recently there has been a trend to put RFID tags in clothing, even embroidering the metallic antennas into the fabric. This works well unless the tag is in direct contact with the skin; some sort of spacer such as an inner liner or another layer of clothing should be present to prevent this.

 

RFID tags may also be embedded in thick dielectric materials, such as plastic, rubber, wood, concrete or asphalt. However, these materials tend to detune the tag antenna causing reduced performance. It is therefore advisable to use specially designed tags for these materials. Even so, the RF waves may not penetrate the material as well (depending on the dielectric strength and conductivity), so some degradation in performance is to be expected.

 

Lastly, attention should be given to the environment surrounding the tag. Metal will block the RF signal, and other materials can be highly attenuating. The more material there is between the tag and reader antenna, the more the attenuation. Also, tags that are very close to other tags can degrade their performance. For example, a number of thin clothing items that are stacked with all the tags in the same place and with the same alignment will make it very challenging to read all of the tags. In this case, it would be helpful to have the tags randomly placed on the items.

 

To summarize, the following is a list of dos and don’ts for RFID tag deployment.

 

Dos:

  1. Mount tags on or in thin non-conducting materials such as paper, cardboard, fabric, plastic or glass.
  2. Orient the tags so that they are at least partially transverse to the radial direction from patch reader antennas. Using the Wave® antenna instead of patch antennas avoids this problem.
  3. rjb blog 6.png
  4. Use CP reader antennas with linearly polarized tags, or CP tags with linearly polarized reader antennas. The Wave® antenna can read either.
  5. Use special-purpose tags for metal surfaces, liquids, and for embedding in thick materials.
    - Conventional tags may be used on metal surfaces with a 1/8” foam spacer.

 

Don’ts:

  1. Avoid mounting tags along the radial direction from patch reader antennas.
  2. Do not mount standard printed tags directly on metal surfaces, in liquids, or on bottles containing liquids.
  3. Avoid metal and thick materials in the vicinity of the tag that may block or attenuate the RF signal from the reader.
  4. Do not place tags in direct contact with or very close to other tags. Future blogs will focus on how these principles are extended to specific practical applications of item-level RFID in the logistics chain.

 

For New Wave product information, or to order New Wave RFID antennas, visit https://www.arcantenna.com/antenna-manufacturers/newave-sensor-solution

Comments | Posted in News By Web Content1

Laird IP67 rated RFID Antenna

September 10, 2019 10:18:25 AM EDT

We have four suggestions for those of you looking for a Laird IP67 rated RFID antenna listed below…

 

  • Laird # PAR90209H-FNF: Right hand circularly polarized RFID antenna that measures in at 10 x 10 inches. It operates on the ISM band of 902-928 MHz and is fixed with an N-Female connector. This Laird part includes four mounting studs spaced at 63.5 mm and requires an appropriate heavy-duty mount, known as HDMNT-100MM.
  • Laird # PAL90209H-FNF: Left hand circularly polarized RFID antenna that measures in at 10 x 10 inches. It operates on the ISM band of 902-928 MHz and is fixed with an N-Female connector. This Laird part includes four mounting studs spaced at 63.5 mm and requires an appropriate heavy-duty mount, known as HDMNT-100MM.
  • Laird # S9025PRNF: An ultra-rugged IP67 rated right hand circularly polarized RFID antenna that measures in at 5 x 5 inches. It operates in the FCC range of 902-928 MHz and offers 5 dBic gain. This Laird part includes two mounting studs and requires the appropriate heavy-duty mount, known as part # ALLPMTE-002.
  • Laird # S9025PLNF: An ultra-rugged IP67 rated left hand circularly polarized RFID antenna that measures in at 5 x 5 inches. It operates in the FCC range of 902-928 MHz and offers 5 dBic gain. This Laird part includes two mounting studs and requires the appropriate heavy-duty mount, known as part # ALLPMTE-002.

 

Note: For most RFID applications, right and left-hand polarity antennas may be used interchangeably.

 

To keep updated with our promos and events follow us and like us on Facebook!

 

For further information regarding the application of this product, you can always reach out to our tech support!

Tech Help at Arcadian Inc. / arcantenna.com can be reached by email at techsupport@arcadianinc.com

Comments | Posted in News By Web Content1

My IP67 antenna has water in it, why?

January 22, 2019 6:17:15 PM EST

Recently, a customer complained that an IP67 panel antenna (in this case for RFID) that he purchased at our website www.arcantenna.com had taken on water, he asked if this is acceptable.  Well,  I do have an issue with an IP67 antenna taking on water, technically it should not happen, but... 

 

The way IP67 is defined is that IP stands for “ingress protection” and the first digit denotes solid particle protection (dust) and the “6” rating means that the ingress of dust is not entirely prevented, but it won’t enter in sufficient quantities to interfere with the operation of the antenna. 

 

The second digit “7”  is for liquid ingress protection (water) and a 7 rating should allow the antenna to be immersed in up to 1 meter of water for 30 minutes without taking on enough water to affect performance.

 

The antenna in question is clearly not meeting the IP67 rating.  However, these ratings are tested in a controlled environment and done just one time.  Which means that when temperatures fluctuate and materials expand and contract, and devices (in this case antennas) are in the field for years, or even just days, the rating can be lost. 

 

The reality is that I’ve not seen ANY antenna that truly lives up to the IP67 rating when it must face direct and often prolonged exposure to rain on the backplane, which was the case here. 

 

My suggestion in these cases is to purchase antennas with "weep holes" or "drop holes" or to simply drill the holes (at least two) yourself in the plastic antenna radome on the side that faces the ground.  The water is going to get in anyway, but these holes will allow it to drain out and dry quickly.  This is what is typically done in RFID tolling applications when the RFID antennas are placed with the backplane facing the sky (think EZ Pass, Sun Pass, Toll Pass, etc.)

 

Any other questions??? Write me at  techsupport@arcadianinc.com

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1 Comments | Posted in News By Mike Crudele

Zebra AN480 RFID Antenna Mounting Options

April 5, 2016 11:48:58 AM EDT

I had a customer contact me this morning, very frustrated that he could not find a way to mount the Motorola / Zebra AN480 antennas he had purchased for his RFID project.  I told him that the AN480 antennas from Zebra have a customized mounting bolt pattern, specifically so you can’t buy mounts anywhere else – BUT they never came out with any decent mounts. Until recently there hasn't been a mounting bracket that could be used with this particular antenna.  So, here is what I had originally recommended to him, and now to you... 

 

Purchase RFMAX part # S9028PCx96RTN (same exact antenna, IP54 rated, but with pre-attached 8 foot/96 inch cable & RPTNC connector) /s9028pcl96rtn-s9028pcr96rtn-10x10-inch-ip54-rated-circularly-polarized-rfid-antenna-with-4-mounting-studs-fcc.html

 

Or, purchase RFMAX part # PAx90209H-FNF (same antenna, IP67 rated, with fixed N-Female connector) /pal90209h-fnf-par90209h-fnf10x10-inch-ip-67-rated-circularly-polarized-antenna-fcc.html

 

These two antennas can utilize the HEAVY DUTY mount, which locks firmly in place, RFMAX part # HDMNT: /hdmnt-heavy-duty-aluminum-mounting-bracket-wall-or-mast-mount.html

 

Or, they can utilize our fully articulating, easy to install EZM6 mount: /fully-articulating-die-cast-wall-or-mast-mounting-kit-for-2-or-4-stud-panel-antennas.html

 

But now we have a mounting bracket that can be used with the Zebra AN480 antennas! RFMAX recently added part # HDMNT-150MM to their catalog, which you can find here on our website: https://www.arcantenna.com/index.php/hdmnt-150mm-universal-antenna-mount-for-zebra-impinj-rfid-antennas-fully-articulating-indoor-outdoor-wall-or-mast.html?no_cache=1

 

  EZ-M6 Wall/Mast/Pole Combo Mount Heavy Duty Mounting Bracket

 

 

Take a look, and let me know if you have any questions.  I’d be happy to help.  Also, log in to our website, and set up an account.  Let me know when you’ve done so, and I’ll set you up with your discounted pricing so you can shop right on the website.

 

Best Regards, 

Mike Crudele, Antenna Specialist

 

To keep updated with our promos and events follow us and like us on Facebook!

Comments | Posted in RFID By System Administrator

RFID Journal Live! 2015 Show Recap

May 13, 2015 7:25:00 AM EDT

Arcadian Launches RFMAX Brand at RFID Live! 2015

 

It's been several weeks now since the RFID Journal Live! Tradeshow in San Diego, and now that we've managed to catch our breath (at least a little), we can offer a few reflections on 2015's premiere RFID event.

 

To begin with, show attendance was at it's the highest level since 2008, and the increase in traffic from the past few years was noticeable. A good sign that business is continuing to recover, and that the RFID space continues to grow. While many attendees were RFID industry insiders and familiar faces, a significant proportion were also end users from virtually every industry imaginable. More good news for the RFID space as a whole, and for growing RFID adoption in general.

 

As for Arcadian, we utilized this year's show to launch our new brand of RFID products from RFMAX. Key products are shown included RFMAX Passive RFID Antennas and Antenna Cables; RFID Weatherproof Reader Enclosures, and the RFMAX Power Mapper. Traffic to the booth was steady for all 3 days of the event, with plenty of people taking notice of the new RFMAX product line. Interest in antennas and weatherproof enclosures was fantastic, but the RFMAX Power Mapper literally stole the show... in fact, we sold out our entire stock of Power Mappers while we were there! (not to worry if you didn't get yours yet... we've since replenished our stock and have more on the way).

 

Overall, we see interest in RFID applications and products continuing to bloom, and are thrilled with the response we received for our new RFMAX line. A great show this year all the way around. Our sincere thanks to all of our customers, partners, and friends, along with the RFID Journal staff for making this year's RFID Journal Live show one for the books!

 

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Comments | Posted in RFID By System Administrator

We just received results from independent testing of the RFMAX Power Mapper, and the results confirmed exactly what we've been hearing from our customers: The RFMAX RFID Power Mapper does what it says it will, and is an indispensable tool for setting up and troubleshooting any RFID installation. 

 

According to the report: "This instrument should be a standard part of any RFID installer’s toolbox".

 

A copy of the review is available here: 
RFMAX POWER MAPPER TEST RESULTS

 

The RFMAX RFID Power Mapper is available for purchase here:
RFMAX POWER MAPPER

 

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Comments | Posted in News By System Administrator

Can't find Motorola AN400 bistatic RFID antenna? Try our circularly polarized 10x20 inch dual port RFID panel antenna.

Recently, we had an RFID antenna customer come in looking for a Motorola / Zebra RFID panel antenna, model # AN400.  Apparently, the customer was having a difficult time procuring this antenna model for their RFID portals.  We informed them that it was our understanding that the AN400 antenna had been discontinued and/or is generally unavailable from Motorola and the replacement antenna is the updated model  - which carries part # AN440. Both antennas have similar mechanical and RF electrical specifications.

 

 

Here are the specs on the AN440 dual element bi-static dual port RFID antenna.  This model has two antenna radiators under the radome, one is LHCP, the second is RHCP.

 

Size: L: 22.6 x W: 10.2 x D: 1.32 inches (575 x 259 x 34 mm)
Weight: 4.2 Lbs. (1.9 kg)
Frequency: 902-928 Mhz for UHF RFID in the FCC band (US, Canada, Mexico, S. America, etc.)
Gain: 9 dBic.  VSWR: 1.4:1.  Axial Ratio: 1 db
Polarity: Left & Right Hand Circularly Polarized
Beamwidth, H&V: 70 degrees in both planes
Includes (2) type N-Female fixed connectors on the rear of the unit.
Mounting: 4 1/4-20 threaded studs on the rear of the unit.

 

You can find further specifications on this antenna or purchase the equivalent here for part # PRL90209.

 

Arcadian Inc., we are the RFID antenna experts... contact us, we are happy to help!

Email us at sales@arcadianinc.com

 

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Comments | Posted in RFID By System Administrator
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